Military Skills and Abilities that Transfer over into the Civilian Workforce

Back in April of this year on this blog, we wrote about several business leaders, all veterans, who are now or have been captains of industry. We wrote about, for example, how FedEx was founded by Marine Corps veteran, Fred Smith and how the company is the 10th-largest private employer in the United States. Despite this accomplishment by a Marine Corps veteran and similar achievements by veterans of many of branches of the military, some recruiters fail to see how skills obtained while serving this country translate over into the civilian workforce. This is unfortunate. Here are just a few of the many, many important skills that members of the armed forces acquire that can be used in the civilian workforce as well.

  • Leadership: No organization can thrive without strong, effective leadership. Leadership requires strategic planning, intelligence and the ability to inspire others to be their best. Sounds like any organization you know? These attributes are gained through service in the military as are problem-solving skills.
  • Communication: Employers need and appreciate managers who can communicate to their subordinates exactly what is required of them in an unambiguous manner. Effective communication skills help in all job interactions and help in the task of goal setting and mission execution.
  • The ability to follow orders: The ability to follow orders is an integral part of every workplace environment no matter what your position is in that company. This and obedience are instilled in people who serve in the military from basic training onward.military
  • Problem solving: Effective problem solving skills are some of the most important assets a new hire can bring to a job. The ability to think on one’s feet and adapt when things go wrong are all part and parcel of effective problem solving.
  • Teamwork and collaboration: Most employers aren’t looking for iconoclastic individuals who want to go their own way. That is because in nearly all of life’s endeavors more can be accomplished through teamwork and cooperation.

Yes, all these are so-called “soft-skills” that easily transfer over into the civilian workforce. They are a part of a skill-set that each recruit learns and carries with him/her for his/her entire life. The acquisition of this knowledge is a reason to be proud of serving in this country’s military. You can also express your pride in the Corps when you purchase an item from our USMC store. We have many items from books and videos to clothing and Marine Corps jewelry.

Tips for Veterans who are Entering the Civilian Workforce

Often, one of the biggest hurdles in the job search process for veterans entering the civilian workforce is convincing potential employers that the skills that they acquired during their service will be an asset to them. So, while this challenge can be great, it is not insurmountable. (Anyway, when has a Marine not been eager to accept a challenge?) To help you meet this challenge, eMarine PX offers you these tips to help you conduct a job search that will result in a quick and decisive victory.

  • Get ready for battle: Many vets are surprised at how difficult it can be secure employment after having served our nation. But it should not be. It has always been somewhat harder for veterans to secure employment in the civilian workforce. According to the site Monster, post 9/11 vets had an unemployment rate of 6.9% in April 2015 vs. the non-veteran rate of 4.9%.
  • Equip yourself: Take advantage of programs that help you transition from military to civilian life. These resources can provide you with the confidence and tools you need to approach civilian employers.
  • Use military/civilian alliances and resources: Certain civilian businesses recognize that we as a nation can do more for our veterans by giving them with the opportunity to excel in the civilian workforce. These businesses have formed alliances with the military to supply job seekers with tools such as career counseling, resume enhancement, interview training and online skills training.
  • Network: There are many groups of ex service members that are willing to help vets who are entering the job market. This is because veterans have a sense of camaraderie that is seldom seen among civilians. Seek out such organizations to find out what its members can do to aid you with your job search.veterans

It really is a shame that some employers cannot see how the skills and experience veterans have acquired through their service to the nation can also be an asset to their businesses. The good news is that things have gotten better in recent years than they were in the past. Great men and women have transitioned successfully from military careers to the civilian workforce and are now members of government and leaders of industry. Whether you decide to enter the civilian workforce or make a career out of the military, we are sure you will want to continue to show your pride in the USMC. Do so by proudly displaying one of our USMC hats and other clothing.

Musicians Who were in the Military

Music has already played an integral part of military history. It has guided men into battle, inspired them during battle and even been used to intimidate the enemy. However, music has also played a huge role in the lives of veterans. Believe it or not some service people have gone on to have had world-class musical careers. Here are 6 veterans who have excelled in the field of music showing that nothing is too great for a veteran to achieve.

  • Elvis Presley: Of course, we had to start with the King himself. When Elvis was inducted into the U.S. Army back in March of 1958, it caused his legions of fans to go into frenzy mode. The ironic thing is that Elvis did have a choice of performing for the troops as a way of forgoing traditional service. Patriot that he was, he chose to become a tanker and served in West Germany.
  • Johnny Cash: The Man in Black (aka A Boy Named Sue), Cash earned the rank of Sergeant serving in the U.S. Air Force where he intercepted codes in Germany during the Cold War.
  • Jimi Hendrix: Rock guitar virtuoso James Marshall Hendrix served in the 101st Airborne Division. However, due to his obsession with the guitar he was considered a poor soldier and eventually given an Honorable Discharge.
  • Ray Manzarek: This contemporary of Hendrix, keyboard player for The Doors, joined the Army before the buildup to Vietnam. He served in Thailand and Okinawa before being kicked out. Two months after returning home Manzarek and Jim Morrison formed their legendary band.
  • Tony Bennett: Born Anthony Dominick Benedetto, Bennett saw hard combat during WWII as a member of the U.S. Army. Bennett did his basic training at Fort Dix and Fort Robinson and served on the front lines in Germany and France.
  • Toy Caldwell: Lead guitarist and co-founding member of the Marshall Tucker Band, Toy served in the Marines Corps when he was injured in battle and received a medical discharge as a result of that injury.elvis

These musicians and many others prove that nothing is beyond the reach of veterans. It shows that people who serve their country have a wide variety of interests and these interests do not have to end simply because one chooses to serve his or her country. Yes, music is an essential part of the Corps and always has been. So too are expressions of pride such as visitors to our site who purchase Marine Corps hats for sale and other Marine Corps clothing.

Things Every Veteran Should Know About the GI Bill

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 – this is the technical name for one of the most significant pieces of legislation to ever be passed by Congress. It’s more familiar name is the GI Bill of Rights and it has changed the lives of millions of service men and women in every branch of this nation’s military. And although it has evolved and been reconstructed since President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed it into law – particularly since 9/11 – it still gives veterans a myriad of benefits ranging from loan assistance for homes, farms or businesses and unemployment pay. It also offers training benefits such as:

  • College degree programs including Associate, Bachelor and advanced degree programs
  • Vocational/Technical Training including non-college degree programs
  • On-the-job/Apprenticeship Training
  • Licensing & Certification Reimbursement
  • National Testing Programs such as SAT, CLEP, AP, etc
  • Flight Training
  • Correspondence Training
  • Work-study programs
  • Tuition Assistance Top-Up
  • Tutorial Assistance

Differences Between the Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits and The Montgomery Bill?

As we’ve said, the GI Bill changed somewhat after the tragedy of 9/11. Under it, veterans are allowed to receive pretty much the same benefits as before. However, there are differences between it and the bill preceding it – known as the Montgomery Bill (MGIB):

  • Buy-in Requirement: Post-9/11: None; MGIB: $1,200
  • Who receives payment: Post-9/11: Educational institution receives tuition; MGIB: Veteran receives payment
  • Book stipend and living expenses: Post-9/11: Yes; MGIB: None
  • Expanded educational benefits: Post-9/11: Yes; MGIB: No
  • Are benefits transferable? Post-9/11: Yes, under some circumstances; MGIB: No
  • Time limit: Post-9/11: 15 years; MGIB: 10 years
  • Yellow Ribbon Program: Post-9/11: Yes; MGIB: No

In brief, The Post-911 GI Bill of Rights, increases the benefits students can receive in order to further their education. It also supplies funds for the cost of living a student may incur while attending school. Because the plans differ from one another, veterans should carefully go over the pros and cons of each. They can best do this by going to the VA website and studying the differences carefully. The government has gone gi billthrough great efforts to show its appreciation for our servicemen and women. They are concerned with ensuring that each veteran reaches his or her potential both in and out of the service. We strive to help service people show their pride with the Marine Corps hats for sale and other items and apparel at our USMC store.

Celebrities who Served on D-Day

This month marks the 74th anniversary of the Allied Liberation of Europe otherwise known as D-Day. The invasion, which started on June 6, 1944, marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe. Many men made the ultimate sacrifice for the free world. And although most of those who served that day have names that the general public does not know, there were some very famous people who fought there as well. Here are a just a few and the roles they played in liberating Europe.

  • Sir Alec Guinness: Long before he became known as Obi-Wan Kenobi in the Star Wars universe, this legendary actor transported British troops in a landing craft onto the beaches of Normandy. A little more than a decade later Guinness would go on to star in the WWII classic “Bridge Over the River Kwai” (1957) as a British POW.
  • James Doohan: Star Trek’s “Mr. Scott” distinguished himself as one of several Canadian officers who lead his men up the hill on Juno Beach. Doohan was struck six times by machinegun bullets. (One of these bullets severed his right middle finger which he often concealed from viewers of the iconic show in which he would later star.) Doohan also trained with the Royal Canadian Air Force and learned to fly an artillery observation plane.
  • Yogi Berra: Famous baseball catcher Yogi Berra manned a Naval support craft and helped to storm Normandy. His craft bombarded enemy positions on Omaha Beach.
  • Medgar Evers: This civil rights pioneer served in the segregated 325th Port Company during WWII. His unit delivered much needed supplies during the Normandy Invasion.
  • John Ford: This iconic film director is known for having directed some of the most famous Westerns of all time. Ford went ashore on D-Day as a commander in the US Naval reserve. His team actually filmed the invasion which was eventually viewed by the public.
  • Henry Fonda: Head of an acting dynasty, Fonda served as a quartermaster on the destroyer USS Satterlee during the Allied landing at Normandy Beach. His ship provided support for the liberating troops. Years later he would star in several movies based on the war including “The Longest Day.”d-day

Yes, the sacrifices that these brave men and others who help restore democracy in Europe will not be forgotten. Pride in the Corps can also be displayed with one of our USMC novelties and USMC home décor items all year round.

Interesting Facts about Father’s Day

Father’s day is right around the corner and although it is not celebrated with the same enthusiasm by some, we here at eMarine PX value the importance of fathers. They are the most important male figure in many of our lives and are one of the cornerstones of the family unit. They do so much for us that it is only fitting that we honor them in some way at least once a year. We especially honor Dads who are on active duty as they have elected to be apart from their families to protect and serve our country. However, as important as this day is, we would wager that many people are in the dark about some basic facts surrounding this holiday. Here are some interesting facts about the Father’s Day.

  • Father’s Day was started by a woman: Sonora Smart Dodd is believed to have founded Father’s Day in Spoke Washington after hearing a sermon at her church that celebrated Mother’s Day. Her father was Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart who raised Ms. Dodd without a wife.
  • Father’s Day is the fourth-biggest day for sending greeting cards: The other big holidays for greeting cards are Christmas, Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day.
  • A father’s death inspired the invention of the drinking fountain: The drinking fountain was invented in 1912 by a man whose father succumbed to typhoid fever after drinking from a contaminated public water supply. The man – Halsey Taylor – sought to both honor his father and keep the public safe.
  • The First Father’s Day: The first father’s day was celebrated in July 5, 1908, at a West Virginia church. The gathering was specifically designed to commemorate 362 men who had died in an explosion at a local mine.
  • Third Sunday in June: The effort to recognize Father’s Day has been hard fought. For 60 years it was not officially recognized as a US holiday. Eventually, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. It was made a permanent holiday by his successor President Richard Nixon in 1972.fathers day

If you are contemplating what to get your active duty or retired dad, you should consider one of the many fine products from our eagle globe and anchor store. We have medals, clothing, decals, USMC novelties and gifts as well as other items that will demonstrate your dad’s pride in our nation.

Top 5 Veteran-Run Businesses

What does service in this nation’s armed forces prepare one to do in civilian life? This is something that civilians who have never served sometimes wonder. Well, the answer is quite simple really – anything and everything. This is proven every day by veteran’s who excel in all walks of civilian life. It is especially demonstrated by veteran’s who have leveraged the leadership skills that they learned in the armed forces into management roles in the business world. It might surprise some of our reader’s to learn the names of some of these prominent leaders and the companies they started or now control. Among some companies you know that were founded by veterans are:

·         RE/MAX: This real-estate giant was cofounded by Air Force veteran Dave Liniger. Liniger served in the Air Force during the Vietnam War and says of his service that it taught him “self-discipline and a sense of responsibility.”

·         FedEx: FedEx was founded by Marine Corps veteran, Fred Smith. Currently FedEx is the 10th-largest private employer in the United States.

·         Wal-Mart: The world’s largest company was founded by a former Army intelligence officer named Sam Walton. Walton achieved the rank of captain. His brother Bud was a bomber pilot for the Navy in the Pacific.

  • GoDaddy: This company, which registers the overwhelming majority of web domains, was founded by Marine Veteran Bob Parsons. Parsons served in Vietnam and earned a Combat Action Ribbon, the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry and the Purple Heart. He has written on his site that he would not be where he is today without the Marine Corps.
  • Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company: Headquarted in Clayton, Missouri, this rental veteran businesscar giant was founded by Jack Taylor, a decorated Navy pilot who served in WWII.

All these men have gone on to found or cofound successful businesses from lives that begin with service to the nation. All have been proud members of the country’s armed forces and would not be where they are without those years of service and the skills that the military instilled in them. All run their companies with that same pride. We too are proud members of Disabled American Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Marines Corps League. Show your pride by displaying our USMC hats and other merchandise from our eagle globe and anchor store.

Top Documentaries about War and the Military

Documentarians have a job that is more complicated and nuanced that those of ordinary film makers. They must attempt to educate as well as entertain. So for those people who have an interest in the nation’s armed forces and in history there are documentaries about military and war. Some of these documentaries are quite enlightening for those who have not served. Check out our list of the top documentaries about this nation’s military.

  • The War: This seven-part series is about World War II and is about the distressing, personal accounts of soldiers from standard American towns. It was made by Ken Burns noted documentarian behind the award winning PBS series on The Civil War.
  • Restrepo: Directed by Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger this documentary is about one year with a platoon fighting in the deadliest valley in Afghanistan. It features: The Men of Battle Company 2nd of the 503rd Infantry Regiment 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Juan ‘Doc Restrepo, Dan Kearney and LaMonta Caldwell.
  • Legion of Brothers: This documentary gives viewers access to the U.S. Special Forces and their efforts in Afghanistan to overthrow the Taliban immediately after 9/11.military
  • Great Raids of World War II: This documentary features six stores of Allied military operations which took place during World War II. It is told through archival footage and veterans who survived the battles.
  • Escape from Marawi: Produced by ABC News Australia, this documentary tells the story of ISIS’ move into Southeast Asia as it attempts to gain territory and membership. It also tells about those who are trying to prevent this overthrow.
  • Secrets of the SAS: In Their Own Words: This four part series explores the Special Forces through candid interviews with former members. It relates their human experiences serving with the top secret, military unit.

Yes, all these documentaries attempt to capture some aspect of war and military life. Some are quite successful at capturing the sacrifice that must be made in order to protect freedom. That is why we have great pride in those documentaries that do capture that experience and relate it to the public as only skilled documentarians can do. We also have pride in the organizations that support us in our efforts to supply our customers with USMC hats and other Marine Corps merchandise from our eagle globe and anchor store. These items are about expressing pride in our nation’s armed forces and the principles that they represent.

The United States Marine Corps Band: A Proud History

Its illustrious history goes back to July 11, 1798 when John Adams signed an Act of Congress establishing the United States Marine Band. Originally the band was comprised of “32 drummers and fifers” who assisted in recruiting Marines and entertained residents in Philadelphia. (This was at the time the nation’s capital.) Centuries later the band, which is known as “The President’s Own”, is recognized for its role in performing at White House functions and at other public places, which total more than 500 annually. This is of no surprise since music has long been intertwined with the military and with war. This goes all the way back to ancient times. The ancient Greeks, for example were said to have used flutists to raise the spirits of warriors in combat. Indeed, one of the most iconic images of war is the painting ‘Spirit of ‘76’ by A.M. Willard, 1857, showing fifer and drummers marching in support of troops.

The Band Itselfmarine corps

The band itself is comprised of experienced musicians who are selected through a grueling audition procedure. The members must of course be Marines themselves and satisfy stringent security and physical requirements. Additionally, band members wear special rank insignia designed to show their membership in the band. The band tours the United States regularly and performs at many prestigious occasions. They perform on occasions such as:

  • United States presidential inaugurations
  • State funerals
  • State Arrival Ceremonies
  • Arlington National Cemetery military funerals
  • Friday Evening Parades are held at Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C.

Music is just one of the ways that patriots have shown their love of country and their support for the troops. Our customers choose to do in the most important way – their service. Another way to show support for the Marines is in proudly displaying USMC home décor and US marine gifts which are all American made. There are many other sites that sell such products but many cannot make this claim.

Awesome Facts about Military Dogs

The USMC has – like other branches of our country’s military – depended upon man’s best friend in times of war. That is because as anyone who has ever owned a dog knows, they fiercely loyal to their owners and work tirelessly to protect them against danger. In fact, the use of dogs in war goes back at least as far as the Mid-7th century BC. They have helped carry supplies, sniff out explosives and psychologically assault the enemy and have performed many other services in support of their best friend – man. Here are just a few other facts about America’s war dogs.

  • Fact: There are approximately 2,500 dogs serving in the armed forces today. 'America's Battalion' Marines patrol central GarmsirMany of these dogs support our troops overseas.

  • Fact: Dogs have fought alongside soldiers in every conflict since the Revolutionary war. At this time dogs were used as message carriers and sentries. Today, they serve in a variety of jobs.

  • Fact: According to the United States War Dogs Associations, canines have saved more than 10,000 American lives. During World War I, a dog named Sgt. Stubby became the most decorated dog in history. It once saved an entire company from a deadly gas attack.

  • Fact: During WWII, the USMC nearly used dogs to attack the Japanese mainland. The assault would have been an amphibious assault lead by a battalion of specially trained canines.

  • Fact: Xerxes I of Persia was accompanied by packs of Indian hounds when he invaded Greece in 480 BC.

  • Fact: Approximately 5,000 dogs served in Vietnam.

  • Fact: The use of dogs as subjects of medical experimentation prompted major reforms. In Laboratory Animal Welfare Act was passed to govern this practice.

  • Fact: Prior to WWII, war dogs were often euthanized after service. President Bill Clinton signed a law that allowed these dogs to be adopted.

  • Fact: Today, military dogs serve as sentries, trackers, search and rescue, scouts, and mascots and therapy dogs.

Yes, man’s best friend will continue to follow him into battle protecting him every step of the way. They are currently an indispensable part of our country’s military. They are acompanion, protector, friend and guide. We have even immortalized them on some of our Marine Corps products online.